RETURN



From PAINTING, ART.



What do you know of the “Bayeux Tapestry”?  The Bayeux Tapestry was a linen roll 77 yards in length, on which was embroidered in coloured worsted fifty-eight scenes representing the life of William the Conqueror. It is supposed to have been the work of his wife Matilda. It is preserved to the present day at Bayeux, Normandy. (Henry Smith)




Well that, for an answer, is what we might rightly call,

Moderately satisfactory only, the reason being,

Is that two things have been omitted. And those are important


From ‘Judging distances’ by Henry Reed.







Event Horizon


Then they dreamed and their dreams wove a white sash

to fold round the light like a comet’s path.

A sinister messenger who came here

for men daring divine fire.


Awake once more from its frozen sleep

and wearing a crown that it may not keep,

does it rise or fall?


There is no way to tell,

but a burning arrow falls through time,

and, by dividing what was from what was to come,

it has drawn a line under right and wrong.






BIRD AND ANIMAL  LIFE.



Explain the reason for the presence of so many hawthorn hedges in country districts. Birds are very fond of haws, the fruit of the hawthorn. When fields were first enclosed and artificial fences were first erected, birds carrying the fruit of the hawthorn perched on these fences and dropped the seeds which germinated. The resulting bushes formed many of the hedges which now mark the landscape.


Natural causes


We have no peace

No rest from the incessant question,

Did he fall, or was he pushed?

and all around, hushed groups in corners whisper;

they have seen the outline chalk-marked on the ground,

but fear that guilt may not be proved.

The trail is cold; the guilty ones may not be brought to book.

Nevertheless we must investigate opportunity, motive and means

and not neglect alibis, false identities, disguise.

Number one, villain or victim?

Mr Hawthorn, alias Hedgethorn,

who lurks in every shady place.

Has he ever been out in the open?

It is rumoured that he has,

observed by countless witnesses,

but will they help? I do not think so!

You can hear them in the distance calling out,

Not us! not us! not us! It is not us that you seek.


Of course our every instinct says,

suspect close relatives and friends,

but try pinning this on Mr Hawfinch and his gang of thugs!

They are professionals.

They specialise, leaving no single seed of doubt,

and all signs here speak of careless work; amateur crime.

We look for one who must return to boast.

And, who is this?

A gentleman in a dark suit!

Were we to say to him,

You are acting in a most suspicious manner,

just come along with us,

he would not refuse.

Something about him tells us that he knows,

but we are wasting time!

It is hardly necessary to caution him;

You need not say anything etcetera,



because, when we get down to the station,

he will not sing,

though in response to the first question,

Have you anything concealed upon your person?

will reply,

in a most musical tone, verging on insolence,  

Search me gov!

We are too late;

he has been to a fence, passed on the evidence

and we can do nothing at all about it.

Our hands are tied!

Long before anything incriminating comes to light,

he will have gone

and his sons, or his sons’ sons, say

It was nothing to do with us!


But were there any accomplices?

Yes indeed!

One or two members of the light-fingered brigade

remain under suspicion.






How can a butterfly be distinguished from a moth? A butterfly may be distinguished from a moth by the feelers. In the case of butterflies these are club-shaped whilst those of moths have no swellings at the end. When resting the wings of butterflies are upright; those of moths are folded one under another. Generally butterflies are diurnal and moths nocturnal, but this is not a very reliable guide.




Toccata and fugue


Butterflies spread their wings and fly by day,

but resting, hold them pointing out,

pious as hands in prayer.


Moths are distinct;

they fly in darkness

and, resting, fold their wings

worn like a villain’s cloak,

shiftless, at night.


They feel the moon's unceasing upward call,

and so perceived,

its gentle pull keeps them in level flight.

Though like tormented souls,

they circle candles, burning;

they never dread extinction, flame, or light.







What bird is called the "ventriloquist" of birdland, and why? The corncrake has always been credited with ventriloqual powers. That is wrong. The bird is naturally shy, and, in the long grass, the pair of birds calling alternately has given rise to this popular fallacy.



Ventriloquist  bird


Listen again to the song that answers its own questions.

Of all birdcalls this,

the most evocative of summer,

filled a special niche,

when the mind ached for magic in the dusk or dawn.


A dying breed,

their habitat has gone.

We do not need the puppet-masters now;

the puppets live!


Only in the outer fringes

where the grass grows long,

we still hear them,

calling across time.






Why does a skylark build its nest on the ground? The skylark is a running bird. i.e., it is especially suited for living on the ground. It builds its nest where the young ones will be in suitable surroundings for their mode of life.




Castles in the air


Mother, what does our father do?

Yes mother, why

is he so far from home?


No, that’s him up there,

singing along with his mates,

and it’s OK for some, I dare say.

I was young once and despite of myself

I was really impressed;

but it doesn’t get the work done.






CLIMATE, WEATHER.



Why is Siberia such an excessively cold country for its latitude? Siberia slopes to the north. Hence it misses the warmth of the sun's rays, and the winters there are extremely severe.




Downhill all the way


Such thoughts must stretch the mind beyond its limit,

delirious as recurrent images in fever,

that part before they form

and then return.


Every inch of this vast land

is tilted from the sun!

It slopes away,

cold in its very bones.


This land has turned its face away,

as sinful man has turned his face from God.






Why is it generally cooler on the top of a mountain than in a valley? The atmosphere takes very little heat from the sun’s rays as they pass through it. It is heated by contact with the earth which has absorbed the solar heat, and also by radiation from the surface of the earth. A larger proportion of the air is closer to the earth in a flat place than on the tops of mountains.




Up the Airy Mountain


One thing very difficult to do

upon a mountain top

is to lie ten feet above the summit

looking down.

But if you did it, you would find

the hill itself

rising to a green, or rocky point,

and all the air around.


Also the sun’s rays

pouring in a silent torrent

falling off

and tumbling down the slopes

to form a flood

so thin we cannot see it.







AIR AND VENTILATION.



What purpose is served by the nitrogen in the air? Nitrogen is essential to all forms of life, being found in the tissues of animals and plants. It is invisible and has no taste, or smell. It will not burn, and things do not burn in it. In the air it dilutes the oxygen in the same way that water dilutes spirits. In an atmosphere of undiluted oxygen animals would live too rapidly. Nitrogen is also elaborated by certain plants, from nitrogenous compounds in the soil, and is stored in their tissues as food.




Noble gas


Yes, I drink to that!

While oxygen is queen of the air,

this is the king,

Four-fifths responsible for the blue sky,

the hurricane, the chill morning,

and the gentle fall of rain.


Birds could scarcely fly in its absence

and it only dilutes oxygen as darkness dilutes light.

But this is not all;

when life began it was here in a different state,

but since then has suffered a sea-change,

and, it is fair to say,

in its present form

resembles nothing so much as diamond,

lacking the cutting edge.







What is meant by (a) Natural ventilation? (b) Artificial ventilation? Natural ventilation is the supply of pure air without the use of forced draughts. Artificial ventilation is effected by the use of machinery and mechanical contrivances.




An ill wind


In those days fresh air was our elixir,

the purpose being

throwing windows wide

and airing winter sheets.


Certain forms of pain endured are not recalled,

but smothered by soft joy.

The plunge survived by lying still.

The smooth white rejects, then yields

the night, that did not take the breath away;

then cold day.










TIMBER, &c.



What are the advantages of needle-shaped leaves to the pine and fir families of trees?  Pines and firs grow in exposed situations, and hence experience the full force of the winds and storms. Owing to the peculiar shape of their leaves, the snow cannot lodge upon them and cause damage by its weight; the leaves offer little resistance to the winds which blow through them without damaging them.




Magic carpet


Of all trees, none is as romantic as pine,

or as utilitarian as fir.

Yet we might be deceived

by the Christmas tree's delicate form.

In contrast the pine tree is gross.


The fir tree grows in the north,

silent as men on the march

who destroy all that they meet.


The pine stands alone

with the smell of the sun on its bark.

In both cases the leaves die,

and when they fall,

or even before that,

silence lies underfoot.







Which English tree suggested the form in which lighthouses are now built? The oak tree suggested to Smeaton, the builder of the present lighthouse at Eddystone, the form which the building would take. Knowing that this tree is able to withstand the storms of centuries, he came to the conclusion that the principle should be applied in the building of his lighthouse.




The restless wave


Here is a rock on which we wish to build a lighthouse.

Notice this, that when the waves crash,

they surge up,

and what you see,

at least remember that you see,

is the curving water in its most dramatic stage.

Then it falls back.


Now the waves rise from all sides

as the storm makes its last attack

and there is a tree of white spray

that reigns on a calm sea.

Rooted it stands as the light turns,

leaving its branches of rich black.








Why are cricket bats made of willow? The wood of the willow is light, tough, and elastic. It does not easily split when it receives a sudden blow. For cricket bats the wood is compressed by putting it through pressure rollers.




Heartbeat


I could explain why cricket bats are made of willow,

but I may not,

it depends how the fancy takes me.

Until then I will lie in the sun and listen

to the distant sound of the game.


The tree is not beautiful

and the pollard willow is a man-made scar.

Though new shoots grow like a cage,

the trees have received such a mortal blow,

but survive.

They exist even after their souls have been taken away

and in this they become more like themselves,

though their hearts break.


Then should the tree grow to its full height

it will forgive,

and when it dies and enters its heaven,

the heart will remain,

beating on earth.








What is meant by (a) "trembling like an aspen leaf"? (b) "Hearts of Oak"?  (a) The aspen is sometimes called the trembling poplar. It is a characteristic of all the poplars that the least breath of wind keeps the foliage in constant motion, the result being that the light underside of the leaf, and the darker side are alternately exposed to view. Hence a person who is trembling is said to be "trembling like an aspen leaf." (b) The war ships of Nelson's time were called "Hearts of Oak" because they were built of the heart wood of the oak tree. This is the strongest and most durable part of the oak tree.




Foreign legion


Everything about the poplar says

that it does not belong here.

An alien form in a foreign landscape.

See how it trembles like a thief!

Nevertheless it is weak,

no lighthouse ever built matches its shape.

It stands with its arms hiding its eyes.

It stands like a spear,

but the spearman falls to the bow.

It carries its arms high in defeat.

Its leaf has two sides,

the white flag of surrender

and the black flag of deceit.


So when it faces our hearts of oak,

this mercenary army of feckless betrayers

whose payment is silver.

Hearing the broadside

and seeing the musket-smoke,

it falls into disarray.









THE FARM.



What is meant by (a) a crofter? (b) a Dutch barn? (c) a steer? (a) a crofter is a small farmer. The name is usually applied to a small farmer in the Highlands of Scotland. (b) A Dutch barn is a roofed building with open sides, used for storing hay, grain, crops etc. (c) A steer is an ox which is being fattened for the butcher.




Pictures at an exhibition


The crofter is best defined by his croft,

where the coldness of winter  

and the dampness of spring drips from its walls.

It stands bleak as the Dutch barn,

a roof, like an upturned boat,

adrift on an empty sea.

Here we do not mention the crops,

for of these there are none


Now we come to the steer.

For this we will need to describe the ox.

And here we need help which this edible mound,

this concentration of flavour, cannot provide.

The ox is rightly a form of cattle that lives somewhere else,

or in the past, but not in the future.

In any case, the future is not a foreign land;

it is not even holiday time.

It is here, made better.

Thus the ox is, by definition, ancient, an outsider.


The oxen are lowing.

The first cuckoo of spring has arrived.

The ox-cart rumbles across the Polish plains.

Its lugubrious progress takes, or has taken, men to the guillotine.

Does it know, this leather clad skeleton

(leather now, that most durable and all-purpose form of clothing)

that it has only one friend, mentioned above?

Is it also aware of the uncertainty all are feeling?

Has it kept, as is said, its soul, bright as the whitewashed croft?

However, underneath, where you might have expected to find the

weight of duty pulling it down,

the space is light and airy as a Dutch barn.

Also the word yoke comes in.

As you know, oxen are often yoked together,

even though the thing that they most desire has, in one blow,

been taken away,

the spirit freed

and waiting for the flesh to join it once again,

is taking Dutch leave.









CARDINAL POINTS, HEAVENLY BODIES, &c.



A labourer working in the fields has no watch. If the sun is shining, how can he tell it is 12 o'clock.  It is customary for men working in the field to fix twelve o'clock (when they usually make a break in the work) by noticing the direction of their own shadow. When it falls directly in front of them, the sun being at their backs, and their faces due north, they know it is midday. If it falls to their right midday has passed, if to their left it has not arrived.




Division of labour


The labourer, climbing his mountain, sees the brow

and plans his rest, only to find an endless upland plain;

the summit wave upon wave away.


He has known morning and the brown potato hour

when rows of ridged-up earth are still intact.

Prosperity is at its zenith,

but the sick child is also most alone,

seeing the white clouds from his window,

and knowing that men rest in fields

beyond the monotonous songs of house sparrows.

The cock crows once.


Here they dream of afternoon

and swathes of sweet cut grass

visited by many silent birds,

and of evening

when the harvest moon,

like a candle in a paper lantern,

rises at sunset for three successive days,

and, lighting worktime,

delays unwelcome night.


But he looks neither right or left;

it is noontide.


North is nearest now and also most remote.

The shadow falls

and divides the even day into uneven parts.









HEALTH, HOUSING, &c.



What points should be borne in mind with regard to exercise? (a) It should be regularly indulged in and should be as varied as possible. (b) it should be carried out as far as possible in open air. (c) It should not be carried to excess. (d) It should, as a rule take a different form from that which comprises our every-day work. For example, manual workers generally find mental exercise restful and beneficial, whilst those engaged in mental work during the day find that physical work provides change and rest.




A dull boy


Forget museums,

gymnasiums of the brain.

Abandon libraries,

gain open air,

find space.


The clerk now binds his fingers,

runs the race, his mind a source of wild delight.

The banker, weary,

flies his kite

or,

floating on a sea of gossamer,

does not care where he spends the night.


The tightrope walker seeks the ground.

The judge makes statements less than sound.

The postman lies upon his back.

The soldier gives the kiss of life.

The shepherd ceases counting sheep and dreams about the farmer’s wife.


The strong are humble,

meek the proud

and, while the people seek the truth,

the monarch mingles with the crowd.









What causes the blood to become dark red and impure as it returns to the heart after its course round the body? Carbonic acid, water and other products are formed as a result of the burning of carbon and hydrogen in the body. To enable this reaction to take place, the blood liberates oxygen, and in so doing changes from the bright arterial blood to the dark purple venous blood.




Passion spent


Once again carbon dioxide is the villain,

the Judas Iscariot of our lives, who will, if we ever drop our guard,

betray us.

The blood that leaves our hearts so full of hope,

encounters everywhere disappointment.

One day, perhaps, it will return as pure and as noble as it came.

Until then we can only pray that the stifling impurity of sin

may extinguish hell's flame.










PAINTING, ART.



How did the dwellers of the caves represent their impressions artistically? In the time of the cave dwellers rude representations of incidents in connection with their lives were made on the bones of wild animals, and on the roofs or walls of the caves.




Survival of the fittest


In the cave

the women come and go,

talking about the man who,

cradled on a rude scaffold of skins

and branches bound with sinews, lies above,

while yellow flame flickers

and tongues of acrid smoke

slope along the roof.


In the distant circle

another, taking infinite pain,

is carving bones

and, out there, on the hillside

before a makeshift frame

with stretched and sun-bleached hide

and a palette of different coloured earths,

is a woman draped in fur,

with tousled hair,

but her work has not survived.










SIMPLE SURVEYING, MEASURING, &c.



What is meant by a base line in surveying? A base line is a very carefully measured line on which all surveys are build up.




Home base


In this case a man needs to find two fixed points.

Call them A and B

and let them represent

his parents.

At one time they were close together

but later became a certain distance apart.

That was his base-line,

though since then

they may have grown further away

and his life diverged,

but for him that distance remains

always the same.









TOPOGRAPHY.



What provision is made on all authoritative maps, in order that distances may be read? A scale of miles is always included in maps which are of any value.




Sample, of no value


Supposing someone were to spy for a foreign power

and wished to send home maps of the British Isles.

It could have happened that an Italian in exile,

yearning for his homeland,

made a parcel of maps

and sent them to Mussolini.

But to escape the attention of the Customs and Excise

he removed all the scales

and on the outside wrote the following words

Campione senza valore.









When a cyclist refers to his map to see in which direction  he must proceed, what must he be careful to do before he begins to read his map?  He must place his map to correspond with the points of the compass. Otherwise he may go miles out of his way, as there are two "right" sides to a road dependent on the direction in which one is travelling, but there is only one north or south.




Miles out of his way


The map is a mirror of reality

and as for all mirrors

the reflection is deceptive.


The cyclist sees that the road has two right-hand sides,

although there is only one north and south,

and is utterly baffled.

He starts to wonder why left and right are reversed

but not up and down,

or whether the same applies

to the points of the compass,

and he looks for the signposts, but finds

that the writing has not been inverted.


Then he understands that

what he should have done

when he left home

was to have seen which way he turned

at the garden gate

and noted it down.


So he rides back

to find out.










THE RAILWAY.



How can you ascertain, without asking any question whether railway lines are in fairly frequent use?  This can be ascertained by the brightness or dullness of the metals. On Sundays for example, when traffic is considerably reduced, the lines become dull. If left unused for some time they become coated with rust.





Sleepers


The railway line, you must know,

is the temporal equivalent of the church pew.

And how can you tell, without asking,

if these are in frequent use?

One way is to look at the eyes,

and if they are shining and bright

you have found one who believes.

But where they are closing or dull

others are going along

just for the ride.









A person is taken suddenly ill in the train. What would you do? In the case of a stopping train it is better not to pull the communication cord, but to wait until the next station is reached. In an express train which is not due to stop for a considerable time, it may be necessary to pull the cord, but only in the gravest emergency.




Communication cord


This man has a problem.

He is racing away through his life,

then something goes wrong.

Should he pull the communication cord

and let everyone else know,

or get off at the next station?


He has to remember

how Nelson

pulled the communication cord at Trafalgar

and the whole nation

went into mourning.








What is the permanent way?  The permanent way is the name given to the track over which the railway lines are laid. It is generally composed of gravel, and has a depth of about 12 inches.




Permanent way


I suppose this casts gloom,

but is unavoidable.

Something that goes on forever

starts here

as a shallow depression

and may reach any destination,

or none.








THE  STREET.



A gentleman accompanies a lady down the street. On which side should he walk, and why? A gentleman when walking with a lady takes the outside of the pavement. This custom dates from the time when there were no pavements at all, and pedestrians had to keep as close to the buildings as possible to avoid being splashed by heavy coaches and other vehicles.





Fool’s Mate


Who has the best of the board, the Queen or the King?

It always depends upon who is defending whom against what.


But we have to explain

why the Queen must remain

on the inside.

Easy to do, as the rule is,

Queen to her own,

and so light is retained in the light,

(love beside love)

and dark in the dark.


But what

if someone were coming the other way?

Is there no fear, perhaps,

that the orderly progress of things

could ever be undermined

by the Knight’s move?








If you saw a child lost in the street, how could you help him? If the child does not know its name and address, take it to the nearest police station. The police will make enquiries and will take care of the child till it is claimed. As soon as children learn to speak they should be taught to repeat their name and full address.




Little boy lost


How do you know that this child is lost?

He may be crying.

He may just say,

Please mister

I do not know where I am,

and I want to go home.


Do not think,

Here all are lost,

but this child is wiser than us,

because he knows that he is.

That is only a way of passing by

on the other side.


The lost child will say,

This is the world

and I did not ask to be in it.

To which you reply,

What is your name and address?

Thus cutting the universe

down to size.










WATERWAYS.



Why do some rivers flow slowly and others more quickly? When a river rises at a low elevation and has a long course, the slope is very gradual and hence it will have a slow current. Those rivers which rise in high ground and have short courses flow down steep slopes and hence they have swift currents.




Surprise


Take a stream that rises in the hills,

it could be you,

it could be me.


Alternatively,

and forsaking others,

it may have bubbled from a subterranean spring.


Whatever its origin,

it does not know what will happen next.


For example,

it may fall

over a steep cliff.








Why are sea-ports usually situated some little distance up a river? Because they are there sheltered from the waves, and because the mouths of rivers very often form natural harbours.




Haven


Where does a wise man hide a leaf?

In a forest.

Of all questions asked here,

this is the most difficult to answer,

the most searching.

It is as though the sailor, seeking his promised land,

finds it,

but, like Moses, cannot enter.

Equally the landsman

hearing the one call he may not resist,

takes a step back.










THE POST OFFICE.



A person wishes to send a parcel of dangerous substances by post. Is this permissible? The Postmaster-General has power to stop letters which are of an offensive or indecent nature. Parcels containing explosives, obnoxious materials, or living creatures are not accepted. Bees are an exception and may be sent by post, if the regulations are followed.




Honey trap


The Postmaster-General is a busy man,

more so than Wellington at Waterloo,

who appeared to do nothing,

but was active everywhere.


Someone has addressed a letter to

Major Sir Arthur Davies Esquire.

He finds this rather offensive.


Someone else has asked permission to send

explosives by mail.

The Postmaster-General is furious.


Another receives a parcel containing bees.

He opens it and lets them crawl out on to the table.

They perform their regulation dance.

He does not understand,

thinking only that,

tired after the journey,

they were dazed by the light.

Others must have been watching,

because the next thing he sees is a cloud of bees

swarming into the letterbox.










AIRCRAFT.



An aeroplane is noticed flying at a moderate height. How can an observer below ascertain whether it is a British machine? Concentric circles of red, white and blue are painted on the under surfaces of the planes. The identity or otherwise of British machines is thus readily established. This is very necessary where military machines are concerned.




Kamikaze


Young chicks detect a certain hawkishness

in the sinister silhouette

and dash to hide under their mothers.


But we had absorbed the warm curves of the spitfire,

the coloured concentric rings,

and emerged into the light.


We found it hard to believe,

though we did,

that this comforting shape

ever made fledgling hawks

freeze in alarm.


But there is another way of returning to hide under your mother,

only to be understood by those

who have seen, in outline,

the rising sun

diving down

to bury itself under the sunset.








How is an aeroplane started preparatory to flight? The propeller blade is pushed down by hand. The engine responds simultaneously and the motion continues. The machine runs along the ground, and when sufficient speed has been acquired it rises into the air.




Poetry in motion


The airman leaps from his plane

and turns the propeller by hand.

The engine bursts into life.

In one bound

he is back in his cockpit.

The plane

moves on the ground

and into the air.


After completing the flight

it comes down

and is folded away

like a jack-in-the-box

on a long bending spring.













Why does a balloon rise in the air? A balloon rises in the air for the same reason that a cork rises to the top of water. The upward pressure of the air on the balloon is greater than the weight of the balloon. The resultant upward pressure (and therefore the lifting power of the balloon) is the difference between the weight of the balloon and the weight of its own volume of air.





Lightness of being


Late or soon

a balloon must fall,

or,

filled with nothing less than air,

will never rise.

But those charged with mirth,

soar,

unless climbing too quickly,

burst,

or, disconnected too long from the source,

feel levity diffuse.


So if there were a fine city on the sky

who would go there?

Not you nor I,

but only those on whom the weight of care

does not lie.










DRESS.



Why are different forms of dress used in different climates? The chief use of clothing is to help keep the temperature of the body uniform. In cold climates we aim at preventing heat loss from the body by radiation, and in hot climates clothing is used as a shield and protection against the intense heat of the sun. The material which serves this double purpose admirably is wool. It is a bad absorber and a bad radiator of heat.   





Sheep’s Clothing


Man, cast out from Eden,

girded his loins with fleece

to keep his passions warm beneath a second skin.


Cooled now, their muscles soft and smooth,

immaculate in pinstriped worsted suits,

the pack advance,

confusing smile with snarl and work with play,

each member seeking any chance to lead,

and those that either do, or fail,

howl at the moon.







In our climate, what material should be worn next to the skin, and why? Wool is best and safest, in our humid climate, if it can be worn next to the skin without irritation. It contains much air, and is therefore a slow conductor of heat, and for the same reason perspiration, or damp, is evaporated slowly from wool, which is not, itself, absorbent, and thus chills are avoided.





Essential oils


Pay particular attention to clothing

bearing in mind that:

By the clothes we know the man.


This old man wore long woollen underpants

and a long-sleeved vest next to his skin.  

Wool is not in itself warm,

but forms a place where warmth dwells.

In much the same way that a duck is kept warm and dry by its oils,

By his clothes we knew him.







What are the essential points to be studied in regard to clothing for motor driving? Too much clothing can hardly be worn when driving and especially in winter and in an open car. The feet and hands should be kept warm and the head protected by windscreen or close-fitting hats or caps, which cover the back of the neck and ears, Motor-veils should be worn by ladies both in winter and summer--in winter to break the cold rush of air affecting the delicate membrane of the throat and nose, and in summer to protect from dust particles.




Dance of death


This lady in the open sports-car wears a headscarf

and is known for style.

She has studied the rules of dress carefully,

who better?

She was not Isodora,     

nor was she meant to be,

but driving through the country under-dressed

she may, by now, have learned the dance of death.








What are the main objections to tightly fitting clothes? Tightly fitting clothes impede muscular action: affect the nerves, which are tributaries to the muscles; obstruct the circulation; and interfere with the work of the internal organs. Tight collars, tight garters and tight boots should, especially be avoided.




A tight squeeze


Nothing is more injurious to health

than the sight of a woman in tight silk.

This has a most severe effect upon the nerves

and on the blood flow.


Tight wool is often worse,

causing the temperature to rise

and the whole body to overheat,

and many a man has found himself undone

by tight garters and tight boots.









Why is leather of such great service as an article of clothing? Leather more than any other material is impervious to wind, and hence is very valuable as an article of clothing in countries where severe weather conditions are met with. During the rigours of active warfare, when wet, mud and snow have to be encountered, no material can vie with leather as a protection against these. It is extensively used in such conditions.




Reactive armour


Unfortunately we no longer hold supplies

of the finest doeskin breeches,

although we can still obtain them to special order,

the leather so soft,

but enormously durable.

We have letters here from delighted clients

dating back

hundreds of years.


This now is what we call the utility article.

It will do.

It gives excellent wear

and is generally known

for customer satisfaction.


But this is the range for which we have gained our name!

The military grade, made to an altogether higher specification,

by a specially patented and secret process.

The outside

(and please to run your fingers over the surface)

is what we call 'whiplash quality' which


'Gives as good as it gets’


notice the firm's motto embossed with the words

'The Original'

laminated over a layer

that has been pre-stressed

and comes from hides of young fighting bulls.


And now, if Sir is able to stand just so,

we will measure the inside leg.










FIRST AID.



Explain how you could readily devise an emergency stretcher in case of accident.  An emergency stretcher can be made by buttoning up a man's coat and passing two broom sticks or walking sticks through the inside of the coat. Small doors and gates may also be used.




Mother of invention


What a chance!

Here is an old man going along with a grey coat

and two walking sticks.


We approach him and say,

Excuse me Sir, but please could we borrow your coat

and your sticks

for someone more needy?

But he turns out to be

deaf-as-a-post,

so we run to ask a white witch for her cloak and broomsticks,

or a neighbour for her garden gate, or old discarded door.









Fainting often occurs in close rooms. What should be done in such a case? The patient should be laid flat on the back with the head low. The clothing should be unfastened round the neck, chest, and waist. The forehead should be bathed with cold water and a little water should be sprinkled on the face. Smelling salts may be applied to the nose.




Sleeping beauty


You should be lucky enough to practise your first aid indoors.

Some people have waited a lifetime for this

and retired, unfulfilled, into graceful old age.

 

Notice, when swooning occurs,

how the taking of breath grows faster.

Even unlacing the clothing does not cause the heart

to beat less intensely.

So, polish the mirror and hold it before her.


If, when lips part,

the glass clouds and eyes dim,

life is near and the world lies far away.










MARKET, TRADE.



What is meant by” a glut on the market”? This expression is used to describe the state of the market when the supply of a commodity far exceeds the demand.




Market forces


This little pig went to market,

while this little pig stayed at home with its two litter mates,

but even that could not forestall a glut

and this little pig was rejected by market forces.










THE HOME.



A woman finds on wash day that her supply of clothes pegs has run out. What simple method can she adopt to fasten the clothes to the line? She can use pieces of string. Damp clothes can readily be tied to the clothes line. Our "handy men" adopt this practice when aboard ship, and it is found to be very successful.





Gypsy’s warning


There is another course a woman can adopt,

when short of clothes pegs on a Monday afternoon.


She can wait until a gypsy girl,

weather-beaten, comes

selling pegs and lucky heathers from an open tray.


But, you might think, our sailor boys,

our handy men, could not do that!

Instead, they clamber in the rigging,

tying wet, though mangled, shirts,

their fingers blue and chapped,

while someone watches from the topmost mast for any open boat.

The gypsy girl, her nut-brown skin,

her flowing hair and coal-black eyes,

rocking on the swell and saying,

Would you like to buy my lucky heather?


But the sea is wide where men may dream

of gypsy girls in open boats

and dream in vain,

because their mothers,

reading fortunes in the tea leaves, said,


Oh do not sail across the seas

to sell your clothes pegs to our sailor boys!











FORMS OF ADDRESS, ETIQUETTE, FRENCH PHRASES.



A gentleman meets a lady of his acquaintance in the street. Who should speak first? After making acquaintance with a gentleman, the lady should always be the first to bow on meeting him in the street. She would also be the first to offer to shake hands if she feels so disposed




Good-time girl


The gentleman does not remember the lady

although he thinks that he may have once made her acquaintance

and he gives her a barely perceptible nod,

while turning away.


She, who knows she has seen him before,

is not sure what to do.

So she bows and holds out her hand as if to take his

and wonders if he

would like a good time,

but politeness

forbids her to speak.






What is meant by the word "etiquette"? The word etiquette means "ticket" or "label." It is used for the niceties of behaviour which mark or "label" polite people.




Ticket to ride


The journey is the same whether you are first class or third.

The difference is that you walk through the train looking for empty seats

and find the kind of people that you wish to join,

but they look up and, in the most charming manner, say

I'm afraid this is first class.











THE LAW AND LAW COURTS.



What is meant by "maiden assizes"? If when a judge comes to the assizes there are no prisoners, it is called a "maiden assize." The judge is presented with a pair of white gloves.




Velvet glove


The purity of man is a mystery.

Although the child exists in innocence,

he eventually falls to the claims of the body.

The Sicilian water-seller calls,

Beautiful water,

pure as the soul of my heart!

deceiving himself.

But is there among us man, or woman,

in whose soul or heart

is a cool place?


The waters of justice flow from barren rock,

and though the heart is pure,

the judge, like the water-seller,

finds rest, but does not quench his true thirst,

when his one gift is no longer required.


He is a man who stands dispassionate

and gains nothing from each selfless act.

Better for him the token, that he does not keep,

of white gloves on the cushion of velvet black,

than the red stain on the white sheet.










THE TOWN.



We often read in the newspapers that the magistrate was presented with a pair of "white gloves." Explain the reason for this.  If there is no case for trial when a magistrate takes his place on the bench, it is customary to present him with a pair of white gloves, symbolic of innocence and purity.




Seeing red


After the furore of the bull-fight,

this trial where the plaintiff and defendant

are most easily confused

until picadors,

like gilded lawyers,

safely mounted,

goad with most pointed questions,

to which there are no clever answers,

she, whose purity is beyond question

will be offered the bleeding ears.


Is it therefore to be expected

that a man who understands the depths of human passion,

but whose purity is, as yet, untested,

because he does not enter the ring,

and who finds no cases to try

(including his own),

should prefer

the white gloves of virtue

to the white horns of scorn?









The word “silence” is printed in very large letters at the entrance to a public building in the town. What does it signify? This injunction is generally found at the entrance to a public reading room and library where talking would interfere with readers.




The mouth of truth


What do they mean,

carved in a public place,

the letters

SILENCE

large and bold in stone?


Clouds thin.


I see lips parted in a noiseless shout

(or grin),

a mouth of truth

to bite the hand that feeds;

these are its teeth!


But for those

bold enough to take the test,

and pass,

it is the road to wisdom’s golden throne.










PROVERBS AND QUOTATIONS.



Why are proverbs and quotations helpful?  Proverbs often express moral truths clearly and tersely. They go straight to the point, they ignore the excuses that we make to ourselves, and they remind us bluntly of our duties and obligations.




Paved with good intention


A pilgrim walking down a long and lonely lane,

that had no turn,

fell to wondering if this were good or bad,

when he met one who beckoned him to share

a mess of pottage, steaming in a cauldron

with a hint of brimstone

and long-handled spoon.


Then began a sweet discourse.

The host, who seemed familiar, asked

Can virtue be its own reward?

Yes, handsome is as handsome does.

And where does charity begin?

At home.

But what would be the consequence

of caring for the pence?

To see the pounds each caring for themselves.

At this he found the need to grip the spoon nearer the bowl,

and felt unease, but said,

This mess of pottage is exceeding good.

Yes, I do commend it, though the recipe is not unique.

Blend fruit plucked from

the other sides of fences and create

an aftertaste that takes no holidays.

Alarms began to ring!

And what is one man’s meat?


He knew the time for ambiguity was past.

This was the ill-wind that blew no-one any good.

Hope sprang eternal in the hour of need.

He grasped at straws.

The cry for rescue by a stitch in time.


So! What is the value of a bird in hand?


He woke to find himself alone

and understood enlightenment

that comes along too late;

that there is no fool like an old fool

and no such thing as a free lunch.


(Because the adversary asked too easy questions on lonely roads   Auden)








PERSONAL HYGIENE.



Which beverage is said to "cheer but not inebriate"? William Cowper refers to "the cup that cheers but not inebriates"- meaning tea. Taken in moderation tea acts as a stimulant upon the nervous system, relieves headache, and produces a feeling of refreshment and invigoration. Only when taken in excess are its effects harmful, resulting in indigestion, loss of appetite, etc. "Stewed" tea is always harmful.




One for the pot


Here is a warm picture,

a comfortable man.

Strange as a stranger,

safe as a friend.

But pity poor the waiter,


Are you ready to order

Yes, I would like a ‘cup that cheers

but not inebriates’

whilst my wife, when she returns,

wants coffee

and a piece of cake.


Sorry Sir, but I did not quite catch that.

He replied,

A cup of tea,

and make sure it is not stewed,

as my digestion is not what it was.


Yes, but was there something else?

Indeed there is!

Mens sana in corpore sano

for one, please,

and soon.


I am sorry again Sir, but did you say,

make sure that the cup stands firm on the saucer?

Not quite that, but like it. I said,  

A healthy mind in a healthy body for one.


Thus Juvenal anticipates the connection

between personal hygiene

and drinking a cup of tea.









Which part of the day is most suitable for people in ordinary health to indulge in swimming? The best time to bathe is midway between breakfast and luncheon. It is unwise to bathe shortly after taking a meal as cold has an injurious effect on the digestion. The strong and vigorous may with safety bathe in the early morning, having previously taken a cup of tea or coffee and slight refreshment.




Absolution


The best time of all to indulge in swimming

is when you are still young,

and standing halfway between dream and fulfilment.

When the water has not been disturbed in the morning,

but waits

with its chill

to receive

what is no more than water itself.


When each cell, clothed in white,

is washed clean

and the soul

remember and forget,

both at the same time.









How is it that a warm glow is felt by a healthy person after indulging in a cold bath? The cold water drives the blood from the surface of the body towards the heart. The heart sends it back again with greater force, and this return of the blood to the skin causes a warm glow to be felt all over the body. If the heart is weak, it is unable to drive the blood back and the body remains cold.




Aced


This is a rare game played between a man and his heart.

For a long time he waits at the baseline,

appearing to hesitate.

Then he dives in.

His heart, that during this time

has been dancing uncertainly,

stands by to return the stroke,

but something goes wrong.


The serve is good.

The ball clears the net and lands in the court.

The ball is in,

but the return does not come.


Our man has been aced!









THE SEA.




A ship is lying on the quay and is about to sail. How can a person ascertain this without asking any question? When the ship is about to sail a small flag called the "Blue Peter" is hoisted prominently. It is a square flag with a white rectangular centre and a blue border.




Blue Peter


Now we have come to examine the hedgerows again

and find that they do not enclose.

We planted them only to satisfy certain desires

that no longer apply,

and, becoming neither butterflies nor moths,

but something else,

which resembles nothing more

than a blue sea

surrounding a square of creamy light,

or a white cloud within a shimmering sky,

we depart.


And we leave,

flying not to the sunrise

or sunset

but to something else,

beside which sunlight palls,

but not because it is overwhelmed,

instead,

it is too bright.


Also we see that the hedges remain,

overgrown,

or, in places,

broken down

and the fields join.










Why does a balloon rise in the air? A balloon rises in the air for the same reason that a cork rises to the top of water. The upward pressure of the air on the balloon is greater than the weight of the balloon. The resultant upward pressure (and therefore the lifting power of the balloon) is the difference between the weight of the balloon and the weight of its own volume of air.





Lightness of being


Late or soon

a balloon must fall,

or,

filled with nothing less than air,

will never rise.

But those charged with mirth,

soar,

unless climbing too quickly,

burst,

or, disconnected too long from the source,

feel levity diffuse.


So if there were a fine city on the sky

who would go there?

Not you nor I,

but only those on whom the weight of care

does not lie.










DRESS.



Why are different forms of dress used in different climates? The chief use of clothing is to help keep the temperature of the body uniform. In cold climates we aim at preventing heat loss from the body by radiation, and in hot climates clothing is used as a shield and protection against the intense heat of the sun. The material which serves this double purpose admirably is wool. It is a bad absorber and a bad radiator of heat.   





Sheep’s Clothing


Man, cast out from Eden,

girded his loins with fleece

to keep his passions warm beneath a second skin.


Cooled now, their muscles soft and smooth,

immaculate in pinstriped worsted suits,

the pack advance,

confusing smile with snarl and work with play,

each member seeking any chance to lead,

and those that either do, or fail,

howl at the moon.







In our climate, what material should be worn next to the skin, and why? Wool is best and safest, in our humid climate, if it can be worn next to the skin without irritation. It contains much air, and is therefore a slow conductor of heat, and for the same reason perspiration, or damp, is evaporated slowly from wool, which is not, itself, absorbent, and thus chills are avoided.





Essential oils


Pay particular attention to clothing

bearing in mind that:

By the clothes we know the man.


This old man wore long woollen underpants

and a long-sleeved vest next to his skin.  

Wool is not in itself warm,

but forms a place where warmth dwells.

In much the same way that a duck is kept warm and dry by its oils,

By his clothes we knew him.







What are the essential points to be studied in regard to clothing for motor driving? Too much clothing can hardly be worn when driving and especially in winter and in an open car. The feet and hands should be kept warm and the head protected by windscreen or close-fitting hats or caps, which cover the back of the neck and ears, Motor-veils should be worn by ladies both in winter and summer--in winter to break the cold rush of air affecting the delicate membrane of the throat and nose, and in summer to protect from dust particles.




Dance of death


This lady in the open sports-car wears a headscarf

and is known for style.

She has studied the rules of dress carefully,

who better?

She was not Isodora,     

nor was she meant to be,

but driving through the country under-dressed

she may, by now, have learned the dance of death.








What are the main objections to tightly fitting clothes? Tightly fitting clothes impede muscular action: affect the nerves, which are tributaries to the muscles; obstruct the circulation; and interfere with the work of the internal organs. Tight collars, tight garters and tight boots should, especially be avoided.




A tight squeeze


Nothing is more injurious to health

than the sight of a woman in tight silk.

This has a most severe effect upon the nerves

and on the blood flow.


Tight wool is often worse,

causing the temperature to rise

and the whole body to overheat,

and many a man has found himself undone

by tight garters and tight boots.









Why is leather of such great service as an article of clothing? Leather more than any other material is impervious to wind, and hence is very valuable as an article of clothing in countries where severe weather conditions are met with. During the rigours of active warfare, when wet, mud and snow have to be encountered, no material can vie with leather as a protection against these. It is extensively used in such conditions.




Reactive armour


Unfortunately we no longer hold supplies

of the finest doeskin breeches,

although we can still obtain them to special order,

the leather so soft,

but enormously durable.

We have letters here from delighted clients

dating back

hundreds of years.


This now is what we call the utility article.

It will do.

It gives excellent wear

and is generally known

for customer satisfaction.


But this is the range for which we have gained our name!

The military grade, made to an altogether higher specification,

by a specially patented and secret process.

The outside

(and please to run your fingers over the surface)

is what we call 'whiplash quality' which


'Gives as good as it gets’


notice the firm's motto embossed with the words

'The Original'

laminated over a layer

that has been pre-stressed

and comes from hides of young fighting bulls.


And now, if Sir is able to stand just so,

we will measure the inside leg.










FIRST AID.



Explain how you could readily devise an emergency stretcher in case of accident.  An emergency stretcher can be made by buttoning up a man's coat and passing two broom sticks or walking sticks through the inside of the coat. Small doors and gates may also be used.




Mother of invention


What a chance!

Here is an old man going along with a grey coat

and two walking sticks.


We approach him and say,

Excuse me Sir, but please could we borrow your coat

and your sticks

for someone more needy?

But he turns out to be

deaf-as-a-post,

so we run to ask a white witch for her cloak and broomsticks,

or a neighbour for her garden gate, or old discarded door.









Fainting often occurs in close rooms. What should be done in such a case? The patient should be laid flat on the back with the head low. The clothing should be unfastened round the neck, chest, and waist. The forehead should be bathed with cold water and a little water should be sprinkled on the face. Smelling salts may be applied to the nose.




Sleeping beauty


You should be lucky enough to practise your first aid indoors.

Some people have waited a lifetime for this

and retired, unfulfilled, into graceful old age.

 

Notice, when swooning occurs,

how the taking of breath grows faster.

Even unlacing the clothing does not cause the heart

to beat less intensely.

So, polish the mirror and hold it before her.


If, when lips part,

the glass clouds and eyes dim,

life is near and the world lies far away.










MARKET, TRADE.



What is meant by” a glut on the market”? This expression is used to describe the state of the market when the supply of a commodity far exceeds the demand.




Market forces


This little pig went to market,

while this little pig stayed at home with its two litter mates,

but even that could not forestall a glut

and this little pig was rejected by market forces.










THE HOME.



A woman finds on wash day that her supply of clothes pegs has run out. What simple method can she adopt to fasten the clothes to the line? She can use pieces of string. Damp clothes can readily be tied to the clothes line. Our "handy men" adopt this practice when aboard ship, and it is found to be very successful.





Gypsy’s warning


There is another course a woman can adopt,

when short of clothes pegs on a Monday afternoon.


She can wait until a gypsy girl,

weather-beaten, comes

selling pegs and lucky heathers from an open tray.


But, you might think, our sailor boys,

our handy men, could not do that!

Instead, they clamber in the rigging,

tying wet, though mangled, shirts,

their fingers blue and chapped,

while someone watches from the topmost mast for any open boat.

The gypsy girl, her nut-brown skin,

her flowing hair and coal-black eyes,

rocking on the swell and saying,

Would you like to buy my lucky heather?


But the sea is wide where men may dream

of gypsy girls in open boats

and dream in vain,

because their mothers,

reading fortunes in the tea leaves, said,


Oh do not sail across the seas

to sell your clothes pegs to our sailor boys!











FORMS OF ADDRESS, ETIQUETTE, FRENCH PHRASES.



A gentleman meets a lady of his acquaintance in the street. Who should speak first? After making acquaintance with a gentleman, the lady should always be the first to bow on meeting him in the street. She would also be the first to offer to shake hands if she feels so disposed




Good-time girl


The gentleman does not remember the lady

although he thinks that he may have once made her acquaintance

and he gives her a barely perceptible nod,

while turning away.


She, who knows she has seen him before,

is not sure what to do.

So she bows and holds out her hand as if to take his

and wonders if he

would like a good time,

but politeness

forbids her to speak.






What is meant by the word "etiquette"? The word etiquette means "ticket" or "label." It is used for the niceties of behaviour which mark or "label" polite people.




Ticket to ride


The journey is the same whether you are first class or third.

The difference is that you walk through the train looking for empty seats

and find the kind of people that you wish to join,

but they look up and, in the most charming manner, say

I'm afraid this is first class.











THE LAW AND LAW COURTS.



What is meant by "maiden assizes"? If when a judge comes to the assizes there are no prisoners, it is called a "maiden assize." The judge is presented with a pair of white gloves.




Velvet glove


The purity of man is a mystery.

Although the child exists in innocence,

he eventually falls to the claims of the body.

The Sicilian water-seller calls,

Beautiful water,

pure as the soul of my heart!

deceiving himself.

But is there among us man, or woman,

in whose soul or heart

is a cool place?


The waters of justice flow from barren rock,

and though the heart is pure,

the judge, like the water-seller,

finds rest, but does not quench his true thirst,

when his one gift is no longer required.


He is a man who stands dispassionate

and gains nothing from each selfless act.

Better for him the token, that he does not keep,

of white gloves on the cushion of velvet black,

than the red stain on the white sheet.










THE TOWN.



We often read in the newspapers that the magistrate was presented with a pair of "white gloves." Explain the reason for this.  If there is no case for trial when a magistrate takes his place on the bench, it is customary to present him with a pair of white gloves, symbolic of innocence and purity.




Seeing red


After the furore of the bull-fight,

this trial where the plaintiff and defendant

are most easily confused

until picadors,

like gilded lawyers,

safely mounted,

goad with most pointed questions,

to which there are no clever answers,

she, whose purity is beyond question

will be offered the bleeding ears.


Is it therefore to be expected

that a man who understands the depths of human passion,

but whose purity is, as yet, untested,

because he does not enter the ring,

and who finds no cases to try

(including his own),

should prefer

the white gloves of virtue

to the white horns of scorn?









The word “silence” is printed in very large letters at the entrance to a public building in the town. What does it signify? This injunction is generally found at the entrance to a public reading room and library where talking would interfere with readers.




The mouth of truth


What do they mean,

carved in a public place,

the letters

SILENCE

large and bold in stone?


Clouds thin.


I see lips parted in a noiseless shout

(or grin),

a mouth of truth

to bite the hand that feeds;

these are its teeth!


But for those

bold enough to take the test,

and pass,

it is the road to wisdom’s golden throne.










PROVERBS AND QUOTATIONS.



Why are proverbs and quotations helpful?  Proverbs often express moral truths clearly and tersely. They go straight to the point, they ignore the excuses that we make to ourselves, and they remind us bluntly of our duties and obligations.




Paved with good intention


A pilgrim walking down a long and lonely lane,

that had no turn,

fell to wondering if this were good or bad,

when he met one who beckoned him to share

a mess of pottage, steaming in a cauldron

with a hint of brimstone

and long-handled spoon.


Then began a sweet discourse.

The host, who seemed familiar, asked

Can virtue be its own reward?

Yes, handsome is as handsome does.

And where does charity begin?

At home.

But what would be the consequence

of caring for the pence?

To see the pounds each caring for themselves.

At this he found the need to grip the spoon nearer the bowl,

and felt unease, but said,

This mess of pottage is exceeding good.

Yes, I do commend it, though the recipe is not unique.

Blend fruit plucked from

the other sides of fences and create

an aftertaste that takes no holidays.

Alarms began to ring!

And what is one man’s meat?


He knew the time for ambiguity was past.

This was the ill-wind that blew no-one any good.

Hope sprang eternal in the hour of need.

He grasped at straws.

The cry for rescue by a stitch in time.


So! What is the value of a bird in hand?


He woke to find himself alone

and understood enlightenment

that comes along too late;

that there is no fool like an old fool

and no such thing as a free lunch.


(Because the adversary asked too easy questions on lonely roads   Auden)








PERSONAL HYGIENE.



Which beverage is said to "cheer but not inebriate"? William Cowper refers to "the cup that cheers but not inebriates"- meaning tea. Taken in moderation tea acts as a stimulant upon the nervous system, relieves headache, and produces a feeling of refreshment and invigoration. Only when taken in excess are its effects harmful, resulting in indigestion, loss of appetite, etc. "Stewed" tea is always harmful.




One for the pot


Here is a warm picture,

a comfortable man.

Strange as a stranger,

safe as a friend.

But pity poor the waiter,


Are you ready to order

Yes, I would like a ‘cup that cheers

but not inebriates’

whilst my wife, when she returns,

wants coffee

and a piece of cake.


Sorry Sir, but I did not quite catch that.

He replied,

A cup of tea,

and make sure it is not stewed,

as my digestion is not what it was.


Yes, but was there something else?

Indeed there is!

Mens sana in corpore sano

for one, please,

and soon.


I am sorry again Sir, but did you say,

make sure that the cup stands firm on the saucer?

Not quite that, but like it. I said,  

A healthy mind in a healthy body for one.


Thus Juvenal anticipates the connection

between personal hygiene

and drinking a cup of tea.









Which part of the day is most suitable for people in ordinary health to indulge in swimming? The best time to bathe is midway between breakfast and luncheon. It is unwise to bathe shortly after taking a meal as cold has an injurious effect on the digestion. The strong and vigorous may with safety bathe in the early morning, having previously taken a cup of tea or coffee and slight refreshment.




Absolution


The best time of all to indulge in swimming

is when you are still young,

and standing halfway between dream and fulfilment.

When the water has not been disturbed in the morning,

but waits

with its chill

to receive

what is no more than water itself.


When each cell, clothed in white,

is washed clean

and the soul

remember and forget,

both at the same time.









How is it that a warm glow is felt by a healthy person after indulging in a cold bath? The cold water drives the blood from the surface of the body towards the heart. The heart sends it back again with greater force, and this return of the blood to the skin causes a warm glow to be felt all over the body. If the heart is weak, it is unable to drive the blood back and the body remains cold.




Aced


This is a rare game played between a man and his heart.

For a long time he waits at the baseline,

appearing to hesitate.

Then he dives in.

His heart, that during this time

has been dancing uncertainly,

stands by to return the stroke,

but something goes wrong.


The serve is good.

The ball clears the net and lands in the court.

The ball is in,

but the return does not come.


Our man has been aced!









THE SEA.




A ship is lying on the quay and is about to sail. How can a person ascertain this without asking any question? When the ship is about to sail a small flag called the "Blue Peter" is hoisted prominently. It is a square flag with a white rectangular centre and a blue border.




Blue Peter


Now we have come to examine the hedgerows again

and find that they do not enclose.

We planted them only to satisfy certain desires

that no longer apply,

and, becoming neither butterflies nor moths,

but something else,

which resembles nothing more

than a blue sea

surrounding a square of creamy light,

or a white cloud within a shimmering sky,

we depart.


And we leave,

flying not to the sunrise

or sunset

but to something else,

beside which sunlight palls,

but not because it is overwhelmed,

instead,

it is too bright.


Also we see that the hedges remain,

overgrown,

or, in places,

broken down

and the fields join.









In 1919, Henry Smith, the headmaster of the Modern Boys’ Council School at New Ferry, Cheshire published:- 1000 Questions in General Knowledge, with complete answers. The book was widely disseminated and second hand copies are still readily available.

On examination it turns out that many of the answers are incomplete or inaccurate, but the choice of questions and the nature of the answers has a wonderfully poetic quality. One in particular asks why the Corncrake, a bird widespread in his day, but now almost extinct in mainland Britain, was known as the Ventriloquist of Birdland. This collection provides new answers to this and 57 other questions.

Event Horizon

Natural causes

Toccata and fugue

Ventriloquist bird

Castles in the air

Downhill all the way

Up the Airy Mountain

Noble gas

An ill wind

Magic carpet

The restless wave

Heartbeat

Foreign legion

Pictures at an exhibition

Division of labour

A dull boy  >>

Passion spent

Survival of the fittest

Home base

Sample, of no value

Miles out of his way

Sleepers

Communication cord

Permanent way

Fool’s Mate

Little boy lost




Ventriloquist Bird

Surprise

Haven

Honey trap

Kamikaze

Poetry in motion

Lightness of being              Sheep’s Clothing

Essential Oils

Dance of death

A tight squeeze

Reactive armour

Mother of invention

Sleeping beauty

Market forces

Gypsy’s warning

Good-time girl

Ticket to ride

Velvet Glove

Seeing red

The mouth of truth

Paved with good intention

One for the pot

Absolution

Aced

Blue Peter